Children’s Health

To tackle the growing mental health crisis facing children and adolescents and the difficulties families face accessing treatments for disorders such as anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), two McLean Hospital-affiliated clinicians have launched an innovative virtual treatment program called InStride Health. InStride Health, which currently operates in Massachusetts and has plans to expand its
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An analysis of the nation’s first and largest comprehensive eye disease registry, the IRIS® Registry, sheds new light on what we thought we knew about childhood blindness in the United States: The leading causes appear to be retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), nystagmus, and cataract, mostly treatable and preventable causes. Previous studies suggest the leading causes
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It is estimated that around 10% of the US population has peanut allergies, a medical emergency that can be treated but not cured. Compared to those without allergies, these individuals are at a greater risk of anaphylaxis. Hence, there is a need to develop novel therapies to treat peanut and other food allergies. A recent Frontiers
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Mind-body practices such as yoga and meditation are increasingly popular tools for promoting health and combating diseases, including type 2 diabetes. Approximately 66% of Americans with type 2 diabetes use mind-body practices and many do so because they believe it helps control their blood sugar. Until now, however, whether mind-practices can reduce blood glucose levels
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A new study explored whether adherence to American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for diet and physical activity had any relationship with toddlers’ ability to remember, plan, pay attention, shift between tasks and regulate their own thoughts and behavior, a suite of skills known as executive function. Reported in The Journal of Pediatrics, the study found
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According to an open-access Editor’s Choice article in ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), third-trimester fetuses with in utero opioid exposure exhibited multiple smaller 2D biometric measurements of the brain, as well as altered fetal physiology, on investigational MRI. Noting the scarcity of imaging literature evaluating prenatal opioid exposure on brain development, “our findings demonstrate
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A group of Stanford Medicine scientists have been awarded approximately $10 million from the National Institutes of Health’s Autism Centers of Excellence program. The funding, announced by the NIH Sept. 6, will support research on the relationship between sleep dysregulation and autism symptoms. This is the first time Stanford University has been designated an Autism
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The first large, real-world study of the effectiveness of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines during pregnancy found these vaccines, especially two initial doses followed by a booster, are effective in protecting against serious disease in expectant mothers whether the shots are administered before or during pregnancy. Pregnant women were excluded from COVID-19 mRNA vaccine clinical trials, so
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Pediatric Early Warning Systems (PEWS)-;bedside tools used by nurses to assess the health of hospitalized children and identify urgent medical issues-; are not widely used in resource-limited hospitals, in part due to challenges with implementation. A recent article published by Wiley online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, reports on a
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In a recent study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers in the United States used mice models to understand how sleep fragmentation affects immunological responses and the epigenetic modifications of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). They also conducted a sleep restriction trial in humans to determine HPSC programming and hematopoiesis. Study: Sleep
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UC Riverside engineers are developing low-cost, robotic “clothing” to help children with cerebral palsy gain control over their arm movements. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of serious physical disability in childhood, and the devices envisioned for this project are meant to offer long-term daily assistance for those living with it. However, traditional robots
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Children who were infected with COVID-19 show a substantially higher risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D), according to a new study that analyzed electronic health records of more than 1 million patients ages 18 and younger. In a study published today in the journal JAMA Network Open, researchers at the Case Western Reserve Univesity
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